. That means “translate” what he says into your own words (not words or anybody else’s). Make sure you capture anything and everything he may be implying or suggesting. Don’t

.  That means “translate” what he says into your own words (not words or anybody else’s). Make sure you capture anything and everything he may be implying or suggesting.  Don’t just include what he says, tell us as much as you can about what is implied, what’s between the lines, where he’s coming from, etc.  Don’t assume that what seems obvious to you is obvious to your readers.  When in doubt, spell it out. . Explain why what he says is important for us to understand him as a character, and how it gives us insight into his reaction to what has already happened, and how it s us to understand his actions as the play develops. prompts him to launch into this speech?  has been happening to him, and how is he reacting to it?  is his mental and emotional state, and why is he thinking and feeling that way?  issues is he trying to work out?  ideas is he speculating on?   do we learn about his outlook, his fears, his personality?  How does what he says here give us insight into his motives in events in the play that come after this speech? Give us as good a character sketch of Hamlet as you can, using this soliloquy as a guide to his mindset and actions.  Feel free to psychoanalyze the melancholy young Dane, but .  The better you explain what he means, why he’s feeling the way he does, and how it all relates to what happens in the play, the better your grade will be.  As always, use short but effective quotations from the text to point to significant words and events, but focus mainly on your explanations of what we learn from his words mean and actions.  To cite the text, place ct, cene, and ine numbers in parentheses at the end of your quotation.  Example: “Your quotation here” (1.3.5). Late papers not accepted.  Don’t let that be you.

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