The goal of this course is to introduce and critically discuss basic concepts, ideas, processes and themes that are central to Comparative Politics; among them: a) what the so-called “nation-state”

The goal of this course is to introduce and critically discuss basic concepts, ideas, processes and themes that are central to Comparative Politics; among them: a) what the so-called “nation-state” is and entails; b) the struggles for and the processes that work against the nation-state; c) different routes of economic modernization; d) the social conflict inherent to capitalist democracies;  e) the “developmental state” and its current viability as a tool for development in the Global South; f) the domestic implications of the so-called “clash of civilizations”; g) whether modernization leads to democracy; and h) current democratic deficits. Countries or regions discussed: Argentina, Afghanistan, Somalia, England, Germany, Russia, Japan and China; Africa, Latin America and the Middle East The final product has to demonstrate that you have seriously put an effort in doing all the previous writing phases. It should have a clearly enunciated thesis, cogently articulated intermediate units (where you develop your argument) and a final section. Before handing the paper in, re-read it and ask yourself some questions. Is my thesis clear? Do I provide evidence to support my main arguments or do I make unsubstantiated claims? Have I incorporated into the paper distinct points of view about the theme in question, pointing out their advantages and disadvantages? In making my main argument, am I showing that one can convincingly rule out alternative patterns of explanation? Last but not least, have I corrected any spelling or grammar mistakes? Assignments will be evaluated based upon two elements: a)       Presentation or style (25%) i. Clarity (15%) ii. Accuracy (10%) b)       Content or substance (75%) iii.      Clearly articulated thesis (15%) iv. Coherence of the analysis (the paper taken as a whole) (15%) v. Depth of the analysis (15%) vi. Range of literature covered (10%) vii.      Use of evidence to support main claims (10%) viii.      Originality (10%) (g)     The paper should have a maximum of eight double-spaced pages (12 point Times New Roman font with 0.98” maximum superior/inferior margins and 1.18” left/right margins). The bibliography is included in the maximum of eight pages. number all the pages. Each paper must make use of a minimum of academic sources (which those from the course kit). (h)     All papers must be accompanied by an assessment of the originality of the text issued by (the course director will explain how to use this system in class). (i)       Instructions for writing the annotated bibliography, essay proposal and paper. Academic writing is a multi-sequenced process. It usually starts out by defining a research question, reading the relevant literature, formulating a thesis, elaborating an outline of the final work, and sketching a first draft. You should see the essay proposal assignment as the outline. The other phases of academic writing involve submitting your work to others to comment on it, reflecting upon this feedback, reading more literature and re-writing the paper. You are expected to do these activities before delivering the final paper. The course director will provide you with feedback on your essay proposal. use those comments to improve the final product. Therefore, you should take the assignments for this course as a way to hone your academic writing skills.

Do you need us to help you on this or any other assignment?


Make an Order Now